10,000 Titicaca Frogs Dead in Peru, Sewage Observed in Area

Source: Servicio Nacional Forestal y de Fauna Silvestre, Peru.
Source: Servicio Nacional Forestal y de Fauna Silvestre, Peru.

SERFOR reports the deaths of more than 10,000 frogs in Coata River in Puno

On October 14, 2016, the Technical Administration of Forestry and Wildlife (ATFFS) in Puno, Pero, acted immediately after receive an alert about the death of frogs (ranas), reported by Mrs. Maruja Inquilla Sucasaca representing the Committee to Combat pollution of the rio (river) Coata. This body of water flows into Lake Titicaca, in the bay of Chucuito, in the north of the city of Puno, Peru.

Specialists assessed the Puno ATFFS dead frog specimens along the river in the buffer zone of the Titicaca National Reserve. They toured two sample points, in which dead specimens were found on both banks of the river.

In the first sampling point, 500 specimens were found along a strip of 200 meter. The frogs were identified as Titicaca giant frog.

Based on the statements of the villagers and samples found following the incident, actual numbers are estimated at 10,000 dead frogs within a 50 kilometers radius of the Ccacachi bridge to the mouth of Lake Titicaca. Human solid waste and sludge formation were observed in this area, though official cause of death is not yet determined. The samples obtained by the ATFFS Puno will be evaluated and their deaths investigated, in cooperation with specialists from the Denver Zoo in Denver, Colorado. Since 2015, Denver Zoo has been  housing, and working to conserve, Lake Titicaca frogs.

To see the original frog deaths report from the Servicio Nacional Forestal y de Fauna Silvestre (SERFOR) — the National Service for Forest and Wildlife in Peru, visit www.serfor.gob.pe/noticias/fauna-silvestre/serfor-evalua-muerte-de-mas-de-10-mil-ranas-en-rio-coata-en-puno.

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